Vegetative Propagation Through Layering

                    Layering Stems still attached to their parent plants may form roots where they touch a rooting medium. Severed from the parent plant, the rooted stem becomes a new plant. This method of vegetative propagation, called layering, promotes a high success rate because it prevents the water stress and carbohydrate shortage that plague cuttings. Some plants layer themselves naturally, but sometimes plant propagators assist the process. Layering may be enhanced by wounding one side of the stem or by bending it very sharply. The rooting medium should always provide aeration and a constant supply of moisture.Vegetative Propagation Through Layering

Tip layering: Dig a hole 3 to 4 inches deep. Insert the shoot tip and cover it with soil. The tip grows downward first, then bends sharply and grows upward. Roots form at the bend, and the recurved tip becomes a new plant. Remove the tip layer and plant it in the early spring or late falls. Examples: purple and black raspberries, trailing blackberries.

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Simple layering: Bend the stem to the ground. Cover part of it with soil, leaving the last 6 to 12 inches exposed. Bend the tip into a vertical position and stake Vegetative Propagation Through Simple Layeringin place. The sharp bend will often induce rooting, but wounding the lower side of the branch or loosening the bark by twisting the stem may help. Examples: forsythia, honeysuckle.

Compound layering: This method works for plants with flexible stems. Bend the stem to the rooting medium as for simple layering, but alternately cover and expose stem sections. Wound the lower side of the stem sections to be covered. Examples: heart-leaf philodendron, pothos.

Mound (stool) layering: Cut the plant back to 1 inch above the ground in the dormant season. Mound soil over the emerging shoots in the spring to enhance their rooting. Examples: gooseberries, apple rootstocks.

Air layering: Air layering is used to propagate some indoor plants with thick stems, or to rejuvenate them when they become leggy. Slit the stem just below a node. Pry the slit open with a toothpick. Surround the wound with wet unmilled sphagnum moss. Wrap plastic or foil around the sphagnum moss and tie in place. When roots pervade the moss, cut the plant off below the root ball.

Plants to Propagate Layering:
Tip layering: purple and black raspberries, trailing blackberries
Simple layering: forsythia, honeysuckle, spider plant, most vine-type plants (philodendron, grape ivy, devil’s ivy, swedish ivy, etc.)
Compound layering: heartleaf philodendron, pothos
Mound layering: gooseberries, apple rootstocks
Air Layering: plants with rigid stems such as dieffenbachia, ficus, rubber plant, aralia, croton

By:- Abhishek Bahuguna
Department of Horticulture
Uttaranchal (P.G.) College Of Bio-Medical Sciences & Hospital